Vietnam Veterans of America & Associates Chapter 1008

                   Who We Are

 

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   Page 1. Home Page

   Page 2. Who We Are

   Page 3. Events

    Page 4. Photo Ops

    Page 5. This & That

                    a) Books List

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                                        Veterans Day
   Veterans Day is the day we pause to honor all veterans from the beginning of this wonderful country until today with the return of the veterans who have been a part of the most recent conflicts. Many of the Veterans of the United States have been heroes. They have did their job above and beyond the call of duty.
    Unfortunately, the word "hero" is used to describe people who are no way a hero. For example, the NFL quarterback who recently set a record for throwing the most passes ever. He is a hero. WRONG. He did it for himself. For his own personal financial gain.
     What about the basketball player who recently returned to his hometown? People by the thoudands welcomed their "hero" home. Hero? Please. Money, plain and simple, that was his only reason.
     Many Veterans would almost laugh if you called them a hero. They would tell you that it was their duty. They proudly did it in service of their country.
     Music tells a story. There are many songs that tell stories. Some of today`s music is questionable at best, but you could say it still tells a story. Often, Country Music can tell a story that you can understand and has meaning. Three songs that come to mind definitely tell a story of heroism, bravery and courage: "Arlington," by Trace Adkins, "Sacrifice," by The Oak Ridge Boys, and "Some Gave All," by Billy Ray Cyrus. This is what bravery and heroism is all about.
    Take a few moments to thank a Veteran today, because our Veterans have given us the freedom we enjoy today.
    THANK YOU TO ALL THE VETERANS OF THIS GREAT COUNTRY.
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                                             Vietnam Veterans of America

   Founded in 1978, Vietnam Veterans of America is the only national Vietnam veterans organization congressionally chartered and exclusively dedicated to Vietnam-era veterans and their families. Vietnam Veterans of America is organized as a not-for-profit corporation and is tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(19) of the Internal Revenue Service Code.

   VVA`s FOUNDING PRINCIPLE:

     "Never again will one generation of veterans abandon another."

   
GOALS:

      VVA`s goals are to promote and support the full range of issues important to Vietnam veterans, to create a new identity for this generation of veterans, and to change public perception of Vietnam veterans.

    ORGANIZATION:

       * Over 70,000 individual members

       * 48 state councils

       * more than 650 local chapters

     SPECIAL PROGRAMS:

       * Aggressively advocate on issues important to veterans

       * Seek full access to quality health care for veterans

       * Identify the full range of disabling injuries and illnesses incurred during military service

       * Hold government agencies accountable for following laws mandating veterans health care

       * Create a positive public perception of Vietnam veterans

       * Seek the fullest possible accounting of America`s POW/MIAs

       * Support the next generation of America`s war veterans

       * Serve our communities

                                   
   

         The VVVA flag is an elegant presentation of America`s veterans service in the Vietnam War. Vietnam Veterans of America Flags are proudly displayed at at all Vietnam Veterans of America meetings and functions and in Veterans Affairs Committee chambers of both the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

     ** The background color is golden yellow, the primary color of the Vietnam Service Ribbon.

     ** In the "hoist" of the flag, the seventeen brown stars, arranged in three vertical rows, represent the seventeen official campaigns of the Vietnam War.

     ** The insignia of VVA, including the identification inscription Vietnam Veterans of America is centered between the campaign stars and the "fly" of the flag. The VVA insignia incorporates the colors and stripes of the Vietnam Service Ribbon, which was awarded to all men and women who served in Southeast Asia and the contiguous waters or air space thereover from July 4, 1965 through March 28, 1973.

     ** Surrounding the insignia, in natural colors, is a wreath containing a laurel branch and a sheaf of rice stalks. The two are tied together at the base with a strand of black barbed wire. The rice represents Southeast Asia, and the laurel signifies honor to all who served there. The black barbed wire serves as a reminder of the POWs and the MIAs who are still unaccounted for.

    For more information about Vietnam Veterans of America go to www.vva.org.

   National Office:

      Vietnam Veterans of America

      8719 Colesville Rd., Suite 100

      Silver Spring, Maryland 20910

      Phone: 301-585-4000

      Toll Free: 1-800-882-1316

      Fax: 301-585-0519
                     

  

  Dear Vietnam Veteran,
     I know I should have written much sooner.
     I can`t say why I did not. Out of fear of admitting to myself, you were there, fighting a war, or maybe ashamed. Ashamed that I never accepted the things you felt you had to do.
     Whatever it is, I know it must hurt.
     Believe me when I say it hurts me more. I have the burden of your hurt plus that of my own. The pain of not being able to share my true feelings towards you.
     I am not writing this for the months you served in Vietnam, but for the many years, you were left alone with only your brother veterans. You served proudly and it went unmentioned.
     For a long time, I`ve wanted to hold you during your times of pain.
     God knows I wanted to.
     And only He knows why I never found the courage. I do not remember what I use to say; maybe I do not want to remember.
     All I know is I hope it is not to late to give you these things now.
     For years you tried to be part of my world. Doing everything to please me, just to be noticed and given a little time and understanding...
     I look back and see the demands I placed on your shoulders when you were young. "Fight your weakness, and always show strength to others around you."
     Who was I to make such a demand?
     I sit here with tears in my heart; finally admitting to myself the one weakness you must have seen in me and never questioned.
     My inability to say the words that I know would have meant so much to you.
     "WELCOME HOME."
     You served your country honorably.
     Please hear these words now, from my heart. Please give me a chance to be part of your world now. The world I should have been part of long ago.


       Love, America

                   The Vietnam Veteran

     We went to war because our country called us, it was our heritage, our duty, our honor, our love of country.